Record $122 million proposed for US Alzheimer's

Negotiations for the fiscal year 2014 federal budget ended with a $122 million funding bill that recognises the need to address the Alzheimer's epidemic facing the US.

 

The funding bill released by bipartisan House and Senate negotiators included the largest increase in funding dedicated to Alzheimer's and dementia research, education, outreach and caregiver support.

 

This achievement was driven by the unrelenting outreach of more than 600,000 Alzheimer's Association advocates to members of Congress, sharing their personal experiences and explaining the dramatic impact Alzheimer's is imposing on our nation and economy.

 

"By allotting $122 million to Alzheimer's research, care and support services, President Obama and Congress are acknowledging the magnitude of the Alzheimer's crisis and need for greater investment," said Robert Egge, Alzheimer's Association's vice president of public policy.

 

"With prevalence numbers projected to triple by 2050, we must increase our efforts if we hope to avoid monumental human and financial costs in the future. This important step is a victory for Alzheimer's Association advocates and all affected by this terrible disease."

 

The funding allocated for Alzheimer's disease includes a $100 million increase for the National Institute on Aging for Alzheimer's research, $3.3 million to support the surveillance of Alzheimer's caregivers, $4 million to train health professionals on issues related to Alzheimer's disease, $10.5 million to expand the home and community based caregiver services and $4.2 million for outreach activities to raise awareness.

 

Additionally, the National Institutes of Health's BRAIN Initiative will receive $30 million to support brain research that could impact several diseases, including Alzheimer's, if passed.

 

There are currently more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer's disease, and that number is poised to grow to as many as 16 million by 2050, according the US Alzheimer's Association 2013 Alzheimer's Disease Facts & Figures report (http://www.alz.org/downloads/Facts_Figures_2013.pdf)

 

14 January 2014.